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One killed, several injured as protests continue across Sudan

One protester was shot dead and several injured as Sudanese security forces used tear gas and live rounds on protesters in Khartoum and across Sudan late this week, according to videos circulating on social media. 

20-year old Mohamed Khalis was shot at close range by security forces in the city of Omdurman on Thursday, according to local media reports. The killing brings the total death toll since the military coup to 102. 

Protesters have taken to the streets opposing military rule in Sudan and preparing the ground for mass demonstrations scheduled for 30 June, said the activists who organised the event. 

The Forces for Freedom and Change (FFC), a broad coalition of Sudanese opposition groups, have called for mass protests later this month in order to “unite the revolution and defeat the military coup”. 

“Our central offices are directing the organising, media and field committees to prepare extensively for the protests on 30 June, bringing together all the forces of resistance we have” said the coalition in a statement. 

Meanwhile the UN-facilitated ‘trilateral mechanism’ met again on Thursday, seeking to revive faltering attempts at political dialogue.

A second round of talks aiming to resolve Sudan's political crisis following a military coup was postponed last week, as the FFC refused to come to the table alongside leaders of the current military government. 

The civilian bloc is still refusing to take part in the talks, calling them a "fake political solution" which "legitimises the coup".

The political process should start "with ending the coup" and launching a constitutional phase that is built on "full civilian rule", the FFC said in a statement last week.

The October military takeover derailed Sudan's fragile transition to civilian rule that had been established following the 2019 ouster of Bashir.

It also plunged Sudan into deepening unrest - near-weekly protests, a violent crackdown that has killed over 100 people and a tumbling economy.

Source : The New Arab


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